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1812 history

Dying for a cup of tea, the nightmare that became a reality

11 May, 1812.  Scourrier  House (near Redruth) Cornwall. Mr Williams was in quite a state when he woke up his wife. Though the Williamses lived over 250 miles from the Houses of Parliament, Mr. Williams had a vivid vision, it was as if he were in the lobby of House of Commons.  In Mr. William’s […]

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1812 history

Andrew Lambert and the War of 1812

If you read British history magazines, you’ve probably read Andrew Lambert.  He’s an academic who writes in a style that flows so well, you don’t notice the footnotes. This is in contrast to the man who Lambert claims is the founder of modern naval history, William James.  James, according to Lambert, didn’t just write stories, […]

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1812 history

Two hundred years and 127,000 American Missionaries later

February 19th, 1812, a man named Adoniram Judson sailed from Salem harbor in Massachusetts to India, and eventually to Burma.  This trip was once called “the most important event of the nineteenth century.” I wouldn’t be surprised if you never heard of Ann and Adoniram Judson.   I hadn’t either, until I looked at old […]

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1812 history Uncategorized

Madison’s act of belevolence: the Venezuela Earthquake and 200 years of American foreign aid.

“I cannot undertake to lay my finger on that article of the Constitution which granted a right to Congress of expending, on objects of benevolence, the money of their constituents.” – James Madison.

How ironic it is, that during his first term in office, Congress spent taxpayer money on uch an act of benevolence.

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1812 history Uncategorized

The sentence for the pamphlet

Daniel Isaac Eaton waited in Newgate prison to find out what his fate would be. Before Eaton could be convicted, a Mr. Prince Smith filed an affidavit in Eaton’s defense. In addition to other words of common sense, Mr. Prince Smith told the court that “It was quite impossible to maintain the fear of God […]

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1812 history

Dusseldorf’s Breidenbacher Hof is 200 years old, or is it?

In 1812, a luxurious hotel was opened in Dusseldorf by the name of Breidenbacher Hof.  Once the most expensive hotel in Germany, it is still among the best known hotels in the world.

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1812 history Uncategorized

Daniel Isaac Eaton’s self defense

Just as the prosecution’s case was brilliant if simple, so Daniel Isaac Eaton’s defense was as inept as it was informative. First of all, Eaton was late for his trial.

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1812 history Uncategorized

When Saint Patrick’s Day was British

St Patrick’s day “a day always precious in the estimation of the Irishman, was celebrated yesterday at the Free Mason’s Tavern.” Reported the Morning Chronicle. So the famous playright Sheridan, the Mayor of London, and a few other notables celebrated St. Patrick’s, so what? Well, unlike in previous years, British newspapers in 1812 saw trouble […]

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1812 history

The Ghost of Thomas Paine haunts the Church of England

When Richard Dawkins recently claimed that Christians were “not really Christian at all”, he wasn’t breaking new ground. Over 200 years ago, Thomas Paine, that oft-quoted American patriot, wrote a pamphlet that said basically the same thing.

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1812 history pirates

Then she stole the sailor’s heart

It had all started when Susannah Lalliment “stole” that ten pound note she saw lying on the floor. After a year of life at sea and waiting at port, it must have seemed that her sentence of a “life of transpotation” really was a life of transportation. Until she met a ship’s carpenter, and a forgotten hero…