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French terrorists vs Spanish insurgents

At the start of 1812, insurgents were big news in the French media. “We learn from Valencia that the small fortress that Marshall Sechet has left in his rear, blockaded by various corps of the army, have successively surrendered, and the siege of Valencia has been seriously prosecuted by General Harispe, who commands under the […]

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Dom Joao VI, The damned Prince, King of Contraditions

(This is Gargamelo’s first post with Ptara.)   April 1812, Rio de Janeiro, King’s Palace. 

The Regent and his two sons – meeting with their state secretary and top ministers – have just received the news that Napoleon’s troops have definitely been expelled from Portugal.  That means that there is no longer a valid reason […]

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When was history?

  39-year-old History teacher Josh Hoeska had a great idea.  His sixteen-year-old students were to hold a tournament to find out who was the greatest examples of courage in American “history.”  The two finalists involved events that happened in 2001 and 2005. In other words, their “history” was the Presidency of George Bush Jr.  Most […]

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What if Taft had won in 1912?

I often wonder why the so-called tea party keeps talking about “the past 100 years.” Do they see Woodrow Wilson’s election as the beginning of the downfall of America? Or are they still talking about William Howard Taft’s election, four years earlier? Whatever the case, 1912 was one of America’s most crucial elections. Had an […]

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Andrew Lambert and the War of 1812

If you read British history magazines, you’ve probably read Andrew Lambert.  He’s an academic who writes in a style that flows so well, you don’t notice the footnotes. This is in contrast to the man who Lambert claims is the founder of modern naval history, William James.  James, according to Lambert, didn’t just write stories, […]

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