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Dom Joao VI, The damned Prince, King of Contraditions

(This is Gargamelo’s first post with Ptara.)   April 1812, Rio de Janeiro, King’s Palace. 

The Regent and his two sons – meeting with their state secretary and top ministers – have just received the news that Napoleon’s troops have definitely been expelled from Portugal.  That means that there is no longer a valid reason […]

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What rides should they have at Napoleonland?

French history buffs are planning their own theme park to compete with Disneyland, and honour France’s best known soldier.  Napoleonland will bring history to life, in ways that could even make fans of “Abraham Lincoln Vampire Killer” blush with embarrassment. Et alors, can pure amusement be educational?  It worked for King Arthur’s Labyrinth in Wales, […]

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Five insults that went out with the eighties

  Some people will point to “progress” and show how technology (or legislation) has made certain jobs obsolete. Me, I prefer to have a positive outlook, and see how the number of insults people throw at each other has diminished since the Reagan/Thatcher/Gorbechev era.  So, here’s a list of five insults that were prevalent during […]

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Two hundred years and 127,000 American Missionaries later

February 19th, 1812, a man named Adoniram Judson sailed from Salem harbor in Massachusetts to India, and eventually to Burma.  This trip was once called “the most important event of the nineteenth century.” I wouldn’t be surprised if you never heard of Ann and Adoniram Judson.   I hadn’t either, until I looked at old […]

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Madison’s act of belevolence: the Venezuela Earthquake and 200 years of American foreign aid.

“I cannot undertake to lay my finger on that article of the Constitution which granted a right to Congress of expending, on objects of benevolence, the money of their constituents.” – James Madison.

How ironic it is, that during his first term in office, Congress spent taxpayer money on uch an act of benevolence.

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The sentence for the pamphlet

Daniel Isaac Eaton waited in Newgate prison to find out what his fate would be. Before Eaton could be convicted, a Mr. Prince Smith filed an affidavit in Eaton’s defense. In addition to other words of common sense, Mr. Prince Smith told the court that “It was quite impossible to maintain the fear of God […]

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