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film history

The use of Flashback in Amazing Grace

Amazing Grace (dir. Michael Apted, written by Steven Knight) seems to be the first major film to depict the life and activism of Wilfred Wilberforce. I was reluctant to write any review because I’m not sure of the historical accuracy of Wilberforce’s life. However, from a creative point of view, I find the use of […]

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history

Happy 104th Father’s Day

“A mischievous youngster named Wood Declared that he wouldn’t be good Till his father one day With a shingle they say[…]” Fill in the last line. Back in 1910, the Los Angeles Herald held a contest to finish that limerick.  Before you read the results, I’d challenge you to finish it yourself. The winning boy’s […]

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1812 history

Why we should care about the Desecration of the Yusuf Qaramanli tomb.

Editor’s Note: I wrote this shortly before the attack on the embassy in Libya.  I did not have time to do a spell check right away, and considered not publishing it when the attack happened. Unfortunately, when I heard about the attack, I was not surprised.  The controversial video on Youtube was not the cause […]

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1812 history

“Land of Laughter”: British and American views of Burma, 1812-2012

When we read about Burma in history books, we read about war.  However, the first representatives of the English speaking nations to that part of the world were Baptist missionaries who saw Burma as “the land of laughter.”

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history

President James Madison and the National Day of Prayer

For at least 200 years, Americans have had a national day of prayer.  Ironically, this “day of prayer” tradition seems to have been started by a man who is known as a bulwark of the separation of church and state. Once again, President James Madison seems to be a man of contradiction.

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1812 history

Two hundred years and 127,000 American Missionaries later

February 19th, 1812, a man named Adoniram Judson sailed from Salem harbor in Massachusetts to India, and eventually to Burma.  This trip was once called “the most important event of the nineteenth century.” I wouldn’t be surprised if you never heard of Ann and Adoniram Judson.   I hadn’t either, until I looked at old […]

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history

Australia’s declaration of secularization

The old Christian calendar to disappear.  — Men from Mars now from “fourth planet out.”  —   Language gets a new name.  — Monarchy disestablished and replaced by national beer. Australia’s ruling labour party has had it with religious influence.  They have decided to secularize their country once and for all.

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1812 history Uncategorized

The sentence for the pamphlet

Daniel Isaac Eaton waited in Newgate prison to find out what his fate would be. Before Eaton could be convicted, a Mr. Prince Smith filed an affidavit in Eaton’s defense. In addition to other words of common sense, Mr. Prince Smith told the court that “It was quite impossible to maintain the fear of God […]

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1812 history Uncategorized

When Saint Patrick’s Day was British

St Patrick’s day “a day always precious in the estimation of the Irishman, was celebrated yesterday at the Free Mason’s Tavern.” Reported the Morning Chronicle. So the famous playright Sheridan, the Mayor of London, and a few other notables celebrated St. Patrick’s, so what? Well, unlike in previous years, British newspapers in 1812 saw trouble […]

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history

The first of all Human Rights

Human rights seem to be falling out of favor. I’ve heard old men deride them, as if they were some new legislative fashion akin to political correctness or “austerity” with their pensions. Recent events in Europe, with the so-called European Court of Human Rights, have tried to bend the meaning of “human rights” in that […]